NoSQL vs. the world

About a year ago, Mike Dirolf drew an enormous circle covering a sheet of paper. “Here are the people who use databases,” he said, “and here are the people who have even heard of NoSQL,” and he drew a circle this big: ° .

I think that interest has grown since then. By this time, the number of people that know about NoSQL is at least this big: o .

For evidence, let’s take a look at what people are searching for. First, here’s a Google Insights chart for a bunch of popular NoSQL solutions:

MongoDB vs. Cassandra vs. CouchDB vs. Redis vs. Riak (source)

Woohoo! MongoDB seems to be leading the charge, so far. But wait, now let’s compare MongoDB (the top line above) to some other databases:

MongoDB vs. Sybase vs. PostgreSQL vs. Firebird vs. Sqlite (source)

Okay, well, we’re behind everyone, but it’s not too bad. You start to see some patterns with the relational databases that you don’t yet so much with the NoSQL databases: people are using relational databases a lot more at work (during the week) than for fun (on the weekends). In fact, MongoDB is occasionally inching above Sybase on the weekends!

How about MySQL, SQL Server, and Oracle?

MongoDB vs. MySQL vs. SQL Server vs. Oracle (source)

Sigh. Back to work, people. We have a ways to go.

Writing MongoDB: The Definitive Guide

Me, with the finished product
MongoDB: The Definitive Guide is now available in bookstores everywhere! (Or at least on Amazon.) Please pick up a copy!

Some interesting things I learned about the process of publishing:

There are professional indexers who write the index.
This amazes me, because we had to proofread our index and I’ve never been so bored in my life. These people must have the exact opposite personality I do. And, in our case, they spelled “Ruby gems” as “Ruby germs.”
Blog posts are a better length
In 500 words, I can edit and polish something until it’s a shimmering jewel of a, uh, blog post. It’s really hard to make a hundred thousand words even have a reasonable flow, never mind be “perfect.”
Illustrations will be assimilated.
When we submitted the manuscript, I had (the night before) whipped up the illustrations in Photoshop that looked like this:

Every document is a beautiful snowflake (because they're all unique)

At the final stage of the editing process, these all got replaced by O’Reilly illustrations, which looked a lot more professional.

Well la-dee-da.

I’m pretty impressed by how well they matched what I was going for, but wish I hadn’t spent so long making those damn snowflakes.

An advance is an advance on sales.

In retrospect, I should have realized this, but I never really thought about it before. If O’Reilly advanced us $100,000 (they didn’t), that just means we wouldn’t get any royalty checks until people bought enough books to give us $100k in royalties. So, essentially, authors write books for free. This kind of amazes me.

All and all, it was really fun and I’d do it again in a heartbeat. In the future, I wouldn’t stick to the schedule quite as rigorously. At the beginning, O’Reilly gave us the following timeline:

  • 3 months = 2 chapters
  • 6 months = first half
  • 9 months = whole book

I write best when I splorch down everything that comes to me as fast as possible and then edit it fifty times. So next time I’d do:

  • 3 months = book of crap
  • 6 months = semi-literate book
  • 9 months = great American (technical) novel.

Andrew suggested we do the National Novel Writing Month, so now I’m trying to think of another thing to write about. I’ll probably do a MongoDB book, but not sure what yet…

“Introduction to MongoDB” Video

This is the video of the talk I gave last Sunday at the NoSQL Devroom at FOSDEM. It’s about why MongoDB was created, what it’s good at (and a bit about what it’s not good for), the basic syntax for it and how sharding and replication work (it covers a lot of ground).

You can also go to Parleys.com to see the video with my slides next to it (they’re a little tough to see below).

http://www.parleys.com/share/parleysshare2.swf?pageId=1864